Change: The Nature of the Evidence

If Hurricane Gustav had struck New Orleans with full force, what would that have told us about the scale and speed of climate change? If more of the sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean is lost in this year's summer melting season than last year (which was the worst on record), will that convince people that global warming is a real and present threat? What should people accept as evidence? And what will they accept in practice? For scientists, the most persuasive evidence that global warming is happening faster than the models predict is the accelerating loss of Arctic sea-ice.

Gwynne Dyer
Published: Wednesday, 09/03/2008 12:00 am EDT

If Hurricane Gustav had struck New Orleans with full force, what would that have told us about the scale and speed of climate change? If more of the sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean is lost in this year's summer melting season than last year (which was the worst on record), will that convince people that global warming is a real and present threat? What should people accept as evidence? And what will they accept in practice?

If you are already a subscriber

Subscribe to Embassy

Subscribe to the print and electronic editions and get instant access to Embassy online.


Quick purchase

Purchase this week's edition of Embassy in electronic format (PDF) for $4.00


Sign up for a free trial

For access to the website.



Comments that appear on the site are not the opinion of Embassy. Personal attacks, name-calling, offensive language, and unsubstantiated allegations are not allowed. For more information on our commenting policies, please see our Community Discussion Rules page.

Newcomer Fall 2014

This Week's Issue
policy briefings

September 24, 2014