Dock workers as architects of foreign policy

The Argentine ship Entre Rios II was at dock in St. John, New Brunswick, waiting for a cargo of heavy water bound from Chalk River to the newly installed CANDU nuclear reactor in Argentina.

Longshoremen’s Union Local 273 Photo
A foggy morning on the docks at St. John, New Brunswick, on July 3, 1979, when a Canadian longshoremen’s picket line saved lives in Argentina.
Jim Creskey
Published: Wednesday, 03/24/2010 12:00 am EDT

The Argentine ship Entre Rios II was at dock in St. John, New Brunswick, waiting for a cargo of heavy water bound from Chalk River to the newly installed CANDU nuclear reactor in Argentina. It was 1979 and although Pat Riley was only a year on the job in Longshoremen's Union Local 273, he remembers the scene vividly.

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