Debate the return of mini-War Measures Act

Canada may need a few good reasons to justify why the Commons should reinstate two controversial police-power clauses that were once briefly part of the law of the land. One allowed police to arrest people and imprison them for three days without laying charges if police suspected a terrorist act could be committed. The other permitted a judge to force a witness to testify in secret about relationships and intentions under penalty of imprisonment.

Published: Wednesday, 09/14/2011 12:00 am EDT

Canada may need a few good reasons to justify why the Commons should reinstate two controversial police-power clauses that were once briefly part of the law of the land. One allowed police to arrest people and imprison them for three days without laying charges if police suspected a terrorist act could be committed. The other permitted a judge to force a witness to testify in secret about relationships and intentions under penalty of imprisonment.

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