Defence, Diplomacy Guiding Arctic Policy

As climate change effectively thaws Canada's Arctic territory, easing its navigation and accessibility, many have begun to rally around plans for better protecting and securing the country's Far North—an area that is larger than continental Europe, comprising 40 per cent of Canada's landmass and more than 19,000 islands.

Michelle Collins
Published: Wednesday, 05/13/2009 12:00 am EDT

As climate change effectively thaws Canada's Arctic territory, easing its navigation and accessibility, many have begun to rally around plans for better protecting and securing the country's Far North—an area that is larger than continental Europe, comprising 40 per cent of Canada's landmass and more than 19,000 islands.

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