Leaked DFAIT Memo Documents Struggle Between Conservative Political Staff and Foreign Service

Fearful that political staffers are severely diluting Canada's foreign policy through alterations to policy language, senior Foreign Affairs officials have begun pushing back against their political masters.

Sam Garcia
Behind the scenes battle: Directives for changes to Canada’s traditional foreign policy language, which are said to be coming down from the Prime Minister’s Office in Langevin Block (pictured top), have fired frustrations through the halls of DFAIT’s Fort Pearson (pictured bottom) and instigated a push back by high-level bureaucrats concerned that many of the wording changes clash with accepted Canadian policy.
Jeff Davis
Published: Wednesday, 07/29/2009 12:00 am EDT

Fearful that political staffers are severely diluting Canada's foreign policy through alterations to policy language, senior Foreign Affairs officials have begun pushing back against their political masters.

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