Weighing the good and bad of trading GMOs

At the end of the 1990s, University of Saskatchewan's Crop Development Centre created a strain of genetically-modified flax, Triffid, that could withstand herbicide residue. In 2001, after concerns the crop might upset markets in countries that have not approved the use of GMOs, the government deregistered Triffid.

Anca Gurzu
Published: Wednesday, 10/20/2010 12:00 am EDT

At the end of the 1990s, University of Saskatchewan's Crop Development Centre created a strain of genetically-modified flax, Triffid, that could withstand herbicide residue. In 2001, after concerns the crop might upset markets in countries that have not approved the use of GMOs, the government deregistered Triffid.

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