Want to get into DFAIT? Sit tight and learn

Think the prototypical international relations degree will get you in? Think again, say experts.

Embassy Photo: Kristen Shane
George Rejhon, a retired foreign service officer who helped revamp the department’s recruitment process in the late 1980s.
Kristen Shane
Published: Wednesday, 10/03/2012 12:00 am EDT

A shrinking public service means job prospects for a person hoping to join the Canadian foreign service now are gloomy, so graduates with their hearts set on joining Foreign Affairs should pursue languages, internships, private-sector and NGO experience until the economic situation brightens, say foreign policy practitioners.

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October 22, 2014