OPINION > EDITORIAL
Afghan beheadings: Back in time

The recent gruesome beheadings in Afghanistan are yet another sign of the lawlessness and anarchy in that country, and yet another indication that the military and developmental efforts there by Canada and other countries will likely be temporary at best. Let them not be forgotten efforts as well.


Sahel crisis needs more media attention

On Aug. 7, the Harper government announced it would start matching dollar-for-dollar the money Canadians give to registered Canadian charities responding to the food crisis in the West African Sahel region. The program is set to run from Aug. 7 until Sept. 30.


Ryan's Canadian bacon

The presumptive Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney, picked his running mate on Aug. 11, United States House Budget Committee chair Paul Ryan.


Tough on crime—until they're not

The Harper government's stern, bullheaded approach to law and order is well documented and well known. By all accounts, it's one of the Tories' strongest brands. It's disturbing, then, to see the Conservatives taking a selective approach to enforcing the law, one that smells quite political.


Celebrate the good work of public servants

The Harper government should promote the great work its public servants do. But that requires that it let them talk more freely than they're allowed to now.


Guard against quote approval in Canada

An interesting conversation is happening south of the border about what is allowable in American journalism, and its implications for Canada are loud and clear.


In defence of a strong arms trade treaty

Canada should seek to hammer out a robust arms trade treaty that works to prevent illicit weapons from falling into the wrong hands. It shouldn't try to water down the international agreement, as it is doing now.


Guard against quote approval in Canada

An interesting conversation is happening south of the border about what is allowable in American journalism, and its implications for Canada are loud and clear.


In defence of a strong arms trade treaty

Canada should seek to hammer out a robust arms trade treaty that works to prevent illicit weapons from falling into the wrong hands. It shouldn't try to water down the international agreement, as it is doing now.


Refugee health cuts won't just affect 'bogus' claimants

After being hammered for weeks by earnest medical professionals in white lab coats, Immigration Minister Jason Kenney finally changed his tune on refugee health cuts earlier this month.


Pressure grows over 'safe country,' health-care cuts

Flying back to Canada from Israel on June 30, Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver could be forgiven if he were tempted to look out the window over Toronto and muse about how different his recent public appearances were in Israel compared to those in his home country.


Health care a cross-border issue

Canada's federal government should be dismayed over what is happening to the Obama administration's health-care plan—for two reasons.


Take a lesson from your friends

Canada should heed the words of a peer review of its international aid program done by the Development Assistance Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's and released on June 19.


Euro-bashing gains little

Question Period has become a veritable Euro-bashing session.


Release information, don't rely on ATIP system

Public information on the inner workings of governments is a vital and necessary aspect of a democracy.


Pit bull image no longer front and centre

When Foreign Minister John Baird was shuffled into his position around this time last year, many wondered whether Prime Minister Stephen Harper's pit bull, as many news outlets had dubbed him, would channel his fierce partisanship into his new job.


Harper's history a troubling overreach

It's becoming clear that there are two histories: Canada's history, and Prime Minister Stephen Harper's history.


Refugee bill changes not good enough

Good for Immigration Minister Jason Kenney for agreeing to changes to the refugee bill, C-31. They are much-needed fixes to some of the most egregious parts of the bill.


Spare no expense, unless it's on diplomats

State visits are typically stuffy affairs. The pomp and circumstance of a visiting foreign leader, between shows of military pageantry and guard inspections, to the bussed-in rows of smiling children waving miniature flags, to the heavy security detail—everything pulsates with a feeling of superiority.


Cuts could undermine immigration changes

Immigration Minister Jason Kenney always seems to be on the go. Barely a day goes by without his presence at a cultural event glad-handing new immigrants, in the House speaking on a bill he introduced, or, often lately, making an announcement on some new change to the immigration system to make it, in his words, "fast and flexible" and focused on the economy.


This Week's Issue
policy briefings