OPINION > EDITORIAL
The cost of not going along to get along

Canada will no longer simply go along to get along.


Asbestos is Canada's blood diamond

Canada has been a key and instrumental member of the Kimberley Process since the diamond certification scheme was established in 2003. Canadian NGOs played a vital role in identifying blood diamonds as a serious concern in Africa, while former Canadian diplomat Robert Fowler's report on the issue led the UN to establish the actual process. Successive Canadian governments have remained strong supporters throughout.


The woe-begotten War on Drugs

The tide may be starting to turn on one of the biggest global policy failures in modern times and a Canadian opinion leader, Louise Arbour, is lending a hand to begin this important change.


A meeting in the middle

As predicted, the Conservatives and NDP are in the early stages of laying out two competing ideas for Canada on the world stage. Unfortunately, the two are squarely on opposite sides of a credible vision.


A new NATO accounting

Established in the post-Second World War era to protect against a looming Soviet threat, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO, has a long and storied history, including victory over the nemesis it was created to oppose. That was in 1991, when the Iron Curtain fell and the world appeared to be headed towards a safer future for all.


Time for a change in oil-sands tactics

The importance of Canada's oil sands to global energy security and this country's prosperity shouldn't be in question. However, that does not excuse the extent to which the government is wilfully turning a blind eye to the damage the industry is causing to the environment—not to mention Canada's international reputation.


Becoming an obstacle

Prime Minister Stephen Harper's decision to block a G8 declaration on the Middle East represents a marked shift in Canada's singular position of support for Israel—a shift that has the potential to seriously affect this country's international standing.


Afghan lessons Go unlearned

Only days before the recent federal election campaign, Canadian soldiers, ships and jets were deployed to assist with the UN-approved, NATO-led intervention in Libya. At the time, the situation was evolving quickly and it was unclear what Canada's role would be, aside from helping protect civilians from Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi's regime.


Russia can help keep the noise down

The past few years have seen a great deal of Arctic sabre-rattling between Canada and Russia—all for public show. When the Russians planted a flag on the bottom of the Arctic Ocean in 2007 to show their re-emergence as an international power, Canadian officials were the first and loudest to correctly criticize the feat.


Time for election monitoring?

In the next federal election, should Canada consider calling in international monitors? The idea may seem far-fetched. After all, we aren't Zimbabwe, North Korea or Burma. Not by a long shot.


Welcome to the new reality

AConservative majority government. The NDP as the official opposition.


The Harper immigration record speaks for itself

As a rule, Canadian legal academics and immigration and refugee lawyers are loathe to express overtly partisan opinions in public. Yes, they do often comment on government policies, procedures and proposed legislation—often in quite critical tones. However, to actually pick one political party over another is highly unusual.


The Harper immigration record speaks for itself

As a rule, Canadian legal academics and immigration and refugee lawyers are loathe to express overtly partisan opinions in public. Yes, they do often comment on government policies, procedures and proposed legislation—often in quite critical tones. However, to actually pick one political party over another is highly unusual.


Still licking their post-Dion wounds

A few months before the 2008 federal election, Embassy sat down with a visiting European official for a chat about climate change. At the time, the environment was top of mind for many Canadians and opposition parties.


Time to practice what we preach

Last month, an interesting Foreign Affairs department report was released through Access to Information. The document was an internal evaluation of the implementation of the Americas Strategy to date.


A review of the Investment Canada Act is necessary

Prime Minister Stephen Harper finally admitted in Toronto on March 30 what many had begun to suspect: His government has no plan to review the Investment Canada Act. No clarifications of the "net benefit" test. No plan to add transparency to the decision-making process.


Oda story still incomplete

After months of opposition grilling and two speaker's rulings that went against her, CIDA Minister Bev Oda narrowly avoided being found in contempt with the government's defeat on March 25. Now she is back on the hustings, running for re-election. But while Ms. Oda may be turning her mind to issues of concern to her constituents just outside Toronto, she has left behind almost as many questions as answers in the KAIROS case.


Not mincing words

On March 21, while Canadian fighter jets were undertaking their first operations over Libya, Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon issued a warning. The focus wasn't Moammar Gaddafi and his despotic regime. Rather, the minister's tough words were directed at leaders in Yemen, Bahrain and Syria.


Harper missing the point on F-35s

The day after a non-partisan parliamentary report said the purchase of 65 F-35 stealth fighter jets would cost $30 billion, or twice what the government had originally projected, Prime Minister Stephen Harper came out swinging.


Scramble for votes crosses line

When NDP member of Parliament Linda Duncan accidentally received a letter from Immigration Minister Jason Kenney's office last week, it confirmed what many had long suspected.


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